Dr Ishmael Jeko

Lecturer

Qualifications:

  • PhD (Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University)
  • Master of Education (Philosophy), Bachelor of Education (Primary Education)
  • Diploma in Education (University of Zimbabwe)
  • Bachelor of Arts (Media Studies) (Zimbabwe Open University).

Research Interests:

  • Philosophy of Education, particularly social justice and democracy in education, critical pedagogy, African Philosophy, Africanisation of education in post-colonial societies in Africa.
  • Pre-service teacher education and Continuous professional Teacher Development (CPTD)
  • Education quality and educational resilience

 

Publications:

Journal Articles:

  •  Jeko, I. (2012). Wither teacher Education in Zimbabwe? Object Lessons from International Best Practices. The Dyke, 6 (4), 148-171.
  • Jeko, I., Mangwaya, E. & Blignaut, S. (2012). Obtaining Informed Consent in non-Western contexts: Reflections on Fieldwork Experiences in Zimbabwe. Acta Academica, 44 (4), 184-208.
  • Jeko, I. (in press). Forms and Quality of Mentoring Support Provided to Student Teachers on Practicum in Primary Schools in Zimbabwe. Educational Research.
  • Mangwaya, E., Jeko, I. & Manyumwa, C. (2012). Availability of Print Curriculum Materials and its Consequences for the Quality of Education in Schools Located on Newly Resettled Farms in Zimbabwe. Asian Social Science, 9 (1), 249-256.
  • Jeko, I. & Mangwaya, E. (2011). College tutors` perceptions of the source of bias in teaching practice assessment in Zimbabwe.  The Dyke, 5 (1), 1-21.  

 Book Review(s):

  • Jeko, I. (2012). Zimbabwe’s Diplomacy 1980-2008: By Wenceslaus Mudyanadzo.  2011, pp. 183. ISBN: 9780797443938.  The Dyke, 6(4), 255-25.

Conferences papers presented:

  • An eclectic theoretical reflection on the conceptualisation and implementation of post-independence education reforms and their implications for social justice in university education in Zimbabwe. Paper presented at the Ist UNIVEN-WSU International Research Conference, East London International Convention Centre, South Africa.
  • he quality of education in primary schools located in newly resettled farming areas in Zimbabwe. Paper presented at the 5th School Social Work International Conference, Mensvic Hotel, Accra, Ghana.
  • Challenges faced obtaining informed consent in non-Western settings: Reflections on fieldwork experiences in Zimbabwe. Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Post-Graduate Conference, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa.
  • Wither teacher education in Zimbabwe? Object lessons from teacher education systems in the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa. Paper presented at the 18th International Conference on Learning, University of Mauritius, Mauritius.