Staff Profile

/Dr Terrence Musanga

Dr Terrence Musanga

Lecturer, Department of English and Communication


Qualifications:

  • (Honours) English and Communication, 2005, Midlands State University, Zimbabwe.
  • African and Diasporan Literature, 2009, Midlands State University, Zimbabwe.
  • Ph. D., English, 2015, University of Venda, South Africa, for thesis “The Depiction of Migration and Identity in Zimbabwean Literature from 1980 to 2010.”

Research Interests:

  • Migration and Identity issues in Literature, with concentration on Zimbabwe and Southern Africa.

Publications:

Published book chapters 

  • Musanga, T. 2015. Representations of Zimbabwean transnational migration and diasporic identities in Brian Chikwava’s Harare North (2009) and Petina Gappah’s An Elegy for Easterly (2009). In: D. P. Sanchez and T. Falola (eds.), Slavery, Migrations, and Transformations: Connecting Old and New Diasporas to the Homeland, New York: Cambria Press. pp. 251-272.

Published journal articles

  • Musanga, T. 2016 Perspectives of Zimbabwe – China relations in Winky D’s ‘Made in China’ and NoViolet Bulawayo’s We Need New Names (2013). Journal of African Cultural Studies. DOI: 10.1080/13696815.2016.1201654.
  • Musanga, T. (2016) Zimbabwe’s land reform programme, migration and identity in Lawrence Hoba’s The Trek and Other Stories. Journal of African Identities.
  • Musanga, T. (2016) Zimbabwean transnational migration, (in) visible masculinities and the reconfiguration of gender in Shimmer Chinodya’s Chairman of Fools. Journal of Black Studies.
  • Musanga, T. and Manase, I. (2016) History, identity and migration in contemporary Zimbabwean biography as reflected in Peter Orner and Annie Holmes’ Hope Deferred: Narratives of Zimbabwean Lives. Journal of African Identities.
  • Musanga, T. (2015) White Zimbabwean farmers’ unstable mobilities, identity and history in Douglas Rogers’ The Last Resort: A Memoir of Zimbabwe. Journal of National Identities.
  • Musanga, T. (2014) Graham Lang’s depiction of the Zimbabwean crisis, migration and identity in Place of Birth (2006), Imbizo, 5 (2), pp. 61 – 71.
  • Musanga, T. (2014) Intra urban mobilities and the depiction of the city in Valerie Tagwira’s Uncertainty of Hope (2006). Journal of Black Studies.
  • Mutekwa, A. and Musanga, T. (2013) Subalternising and Reclaiming Ecocentric Environmental Discourses in Zimbabwean Literature: (Re) reading Doris Lessing’s The Grass is Singing and Chenjerai Hove’s Ancestors. Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Volume 20 (2), pp. 239- 257.
  • Musanga, T. and Mutekwa, A. (2013) Supramasculinities and suprafemininities in Solomon Mutsvairo’s Chaminuka: Prophet of Zimbabwe (1983) and Yvonne Vera’s Nehanda (1993). Journal of African Identities. Volume 11 Issue 1, pp 79-92.
  • Musanga, T. and Mutekwa, A.  (2011) Destabilizing and Subverting Patriarchal and Eurocentric notions of Time: An analysis of Chenjerai Hove’s Bones and Ancestors. Journal of Black Studies. 42 (8), pp 1299-1319.
  • Musanga, T. (2009) The journey motif and the search for life’s meaning in Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist (1980).  Unisa Latin American Report, 1 (1), pp 100-110.

Conferences and seminars attended and papers presented

  • 4 – 8 August 2015: Attended a writing workshop where I was working on a paper entitled Perspectives of Zimbabwe – China relations in Winky D’s ‘Made in China’ and NoViolet Bulawayo’s We Need New Names (2013) at the Emerging Southern African Scholars Writing Workshop ‘Southern Africa Beyond the West: Political, Economic and Cultural Relationships with the BRICS Countries and the Global South’ in Livingstone, Zambia.
  • 4-6 April 2014: Attended and presented a paper entitled Representations of transnational migration and diasporic identities in Brian Chikwava’s Harare North (2009) and Petina Gappah’s An Elegy for Easterly (2009) at the University of Texas at Austin (Texas, USA): African Diasporas: Old and New.
  • 12 – 13 September 2013: Attended and presented a paper titled History, migration and identity and migration in Contemporary Zimbabwean fiction as reflected in Peter Orner and Annie Holmes’ (2010) Hope Deferred: Narratives of Zimbabwean Lives at the Postcolonial Studies Association Conference: History, Postcolonialism and Tradition, Kingston University, England.